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Hockey 101 The Rules

#1 User is online   billvill 

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 05:44 PM

Some common hockey rules, their description and the referee's signal for that penalty:
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Offsides:

A player may not skate into his offensive zone ahead of the puck. If that happens, a whistle is blown, and a face-off is held just outside the zone where the breach-offside- occurred. What matters in an offside is the position of the skates: Both skates must be all the way over the blue line for a player to be potentially off-side. The location of the stick does not matter. Offside is also called if a player makes what is called a two-line pass.

Offside is called to keep players from hanging around the red line at center ice, or all the way down in their offensive zone, and waiting for a pass that will give them a breakaway (skating toward the goal with no defenders around except for the goalie) and an easy chance at a goal.

Icing:


Icing is called when a player behind the red line in his end of the rink shoots a puck past the goal line in his offensive zone when both teams are playing at even strength. Play is stopped when an opponent other than the goalie touches the puck. Icing is considered an infraction because it can be used by teams to take away legitimate scoring chances from skaters on the offensive.


Tripping:

Using a stick, arm, or leg to cause an opponent to trip or fall. No matter how you trip your opponent- with your stick, knee, foot, arm, or hand-it still adds up to tripping.

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Hooking:


If a player impedes the progress of another by "hooking" him with his stick and keeping him from making a play, then he is called for hooking. Generally that happens when a skater has scooted by the person in charge of guarding him, and the defenseman has no other recourse but to hold the player up by "hooking" him with his stick. Not only does that break up a play illegally, but it can also injure a player, especially if the stick used in the hooking comes up high and hits the opposing player in his face. Hooking is also known as water skiing - which gives you a good idea of what is involved.

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Cross Checking:

If a player picks their stick up off of the ice and holds it in two hands to check an opponent (using the shaft of the stick), they may be called for cross checking.

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Holding:

Using your hands on an opponent or the opponent's equipment to impede their progress is not permitted. Holding can prevent a player from being able to exhibit their full range of talent...and can reduce their ability to score a goal.

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Boarding:

The officials whistle for this infraction when a player hits an opponent who is not aware of the impending contact and therefore cannot defend himself from behind. It is a very dangerous infraction that can lead to serious injury to the person who has been hit. It may even lead to a major penalty being given.

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Charging:


This penalty occurs when a player takes more than three strides before deliberately checking an opponent. A minor or major penalty may be imposed upon a person who skates or jumps into, or charges, an opponent in any way. Whether its determined to be a major or minor penalty depends upon the seriousness of the infraction; the more dangerous the hit, the more likely it will be a major.

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High Sticking:


Any contact made by a stick on an opponent above the shoulders is not allowed, and a minor penalty will be assessed. This rule is supposed to protect the players from being hit in the face, eyes, or head. Also, players cannot bat the puck above the normal height of the shoulders; play is stopped if that happens. In addition, any apparent goal scored as a result of a player striking the puck with his stick above his shoulder is not allowed.

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Minors, Majors, Misconducts, Game Misconducts, Match Penalties, and other indiscretions

Hockey has a variety of different offenses that can be committed by players or even coaches. These can play a major role in the how games are played as penalties result in a team having to play shorthanded giving the other team a significant advantage in manpower on the ice and usually an excellent opportunity to score goals. Below are the general types of penalties as well as an explaination of some of the more common calls you'll see in games as well as the signals the referree or linesman will use to signal them in a game.

Types of Penalties:

Minor Penalty


Any player, other than a goaltender, shall be ruled off the ice for two minutes during which time no substitute shall be permitted. If the shorthanded team is scored upon before the two minutes elapse, the player in the penalty box is automatically released.

Major Penalty

Any player, except the goaltender, shall be ruled off the ice for four or five minutes during which time no substitute shall be permitted. The player who is serving the major penalty must stay in the penalty box for the full five, regardless if a goal is scored upon their "shorthanded" team.

Goaltender's Penalties

A goaltender shall not be sent to the penalty box for an infraction, but instead the minor penalty shall be served by another member of his team, who was on the ice when the infraction was committed.

Penalty shot

No time served. Awarded for a player being fouled from behind and denied a breakaway scoring opportunity. Also called for deliberately displacing the goal post during a breakaway, or can be called when a defending player other than the goalie intentionally falls on the puck, ususually around the defensive net area.

Coincidental

minor and/or major penalties result when players of two opposing teams are simultaneously assessed penalties of equal duration. In this case, the players may be substituted for, but all penalized players must serve their full time in the penalty box and wait for a stoppage of play to come out of the box. Generally, the timekeeper will not post these penalties on the scoreboard and the players will be required to stay in the box for the amount of time assessed and until "the next whistle".

Misconduct Penalty

Any player, other than the goaltender, shall be ruled off the ice for a period of ten minutes. A substitute player is permitted to immediately replace a player serving a misconduct penalty. A player whose misconduct penalty has expired shall remain in the penalty box until the next stoppage of play. These penalties are often called in tandem with a minor penalty and you may hear it referred to as a "Two and ten". What this means is that the player has committed a foul such as Checking from Behind and his/her team must play shorthanded for 2 minutes but the offending player must then also stay off the ice for an additional 10 minutes. Generally, a team will put two players in the penalty box with one coming out after two minutes.

Match Penalty

A match penalty involves the suspension of a player for the balance of the game and the offender shall be ordered to the dressing room immediately. A substitute player is permitted to replace the penalized player after five minutes of playing time has elapsed.

Game Misconduct

A penalty that involves the suspension of a player for the balance of the game. A substitute is immediately permitted to take his place on the ice.
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#2 User is offline   FanSince74 

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 07:47 PM

Call me confussed, I thought they got rid of the two line pass.
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#3 User is online   billvill 

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 07:51 PM

View PostFanSince74, on Dec 11 2009, 07:47 PM, said:

Call me confussed, I thought they got rid of the two line pass.

Good catch FS! You are correct. 2 Line pass ....gone. :squee:
I'm Dan Bylsma, and I'm Fired!

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#4 User is offline   FanSince74 

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 08:03 PM

View Postbillvill, on Dec 11 2009, 07:51 PM, said:

Good catch FS! You are correct. 2 Line pass ....gone. :squee:



I had to read that a few times, but then I thought it may have been college or HS rules. I always hated the 2 line pass, broke up any chance of a nice breakaway.
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#5 User is offline   Badger Bob 

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 10:41 AM

OK, my nephew hit me up with a couple of a questions over the weekend and I didn't have the answer. I didn't look them up because I thought it would be cool to toss them out here for some responses:


1. If a player makes a pass to one of his teammates and then leaves the ice to go to the bench and it turns out that the pass becomes an assist on a goal that happens after he leaves the ice, does he get a "+"? (Assume this is not a PP situation).

2. Does the guy that jumped onto the ice prior to the puck going into the net get a "+"?

3. I guess it's also possible for a goal to be scored in the same fashion, especially in an empty net situation. So if a player tosses a slow moving puck toward the net, jumps onto the bench and another jumps on, and then the puck goes in, does the goal scoring player get a "+"?

Obviously these are rare situations, but I'm sure 1 and 2 have happened many times. No.3 not so much.

Pretty sure I know the answers, but just wanted to see what yinz thought.
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#6 User is offline   coach bob 

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 11:45 AM

I would say that any assist that is awarded a player would be a + in the books. It shouldn't matter if he left the ice prior to the goal because it is a continuation of the play. I would say the same for the empty net situation you described too.
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#7 User is offline   Badger Bob 

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:12 PM

whar's that licensed ref when you need him? :wub:


Probably puking. :Mikey:
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